Discussion: Susan Wolf “Sanity and the Metaphysics of Responsibility”

We are pleased to announce that Susan Wolf will join us on Wednesday,  November 7 to discuss her classic essay “Sanity and the Metaphysics of Responsibility” (in Schoeman (ed.), Responsibility, Character, and the Emotions: New Essays in Moral Psychology. Cambridge University Press (1987)). As usual, we’ll meet in room 208 of Caldwell Hall from 7:00pm-8:30pm and there will be pizza.

Discussion: Radden and Foryce’s “Into the Darkness: Losing Identity with Dementia”

Next Wednesday (October 24) we’ll meet in room 208 of Caldwell Hall from 7:00-8:30 to discuss Jennifer Radden and Joan Fordyce’s “Into the Darkness: Losing Identity with Dementia” (in Dementia: Mind, Meaning and the Person, Eds. Hughes, Louw, and Sabat, OUP, 2006). Please contact Dan if you would like to obtain a copy of the reading. As usual, there will be pizza.

Event: “The Criminal Psychopath Magnetized: Insights from Neuroimaging:

Duke Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences Grand Rounds

“The Criminal Psychopath Magnetized:Insights from Neuroimaging”

18 October 2012, 12:00-1:00 pm

Duke North, Room 2002

Presenter: Kent A. Kiehl, PhD, Associate Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at the University of New Mexico and Executive Science Officer of the non-profit Mind Research Network in Albuquerque, NM

Hosted By: Murali Doraiswamy, MBBS

Dr. Kiehl is an Associate Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience at the University of New Mexico and Executive Science Officer of the non-profit Mind Research Network in Albuquerque, NM.  Dr. Kiehl conducts clinical neuroscience research of major mental illnesses, with special focus on criminal psychopathy, sex offenders, substance abuse, and psychotic disorders.

Dr. Kiehl’s laboratory makes use of the one-of-a-kind Mind Mobile MRI System (patent pending) to conduct research and treatment protocols with forensic populations. To date his laboratory has deployed the Mobile MRI to collect brain imaging data from over 2500 offenders at eight different facilities in two states. This represents the world’s largest forensic neuroscience repository.

Objectives:

·         Summarize the two main challenges in the clinical assessment of psychopathy.

·         State the evidence for the predictive utility of psychopathy in forensic contexts.

·         List and describe two of the latest findings in the study (field) of the neuroscience of psychopathy.

·         Discuss the relevance (or not) of the neuroscience of psychopathy to the legal system based on the information presented.