Presentation: Daniel Moseley, “Gun Violence and Mental Disorders”

For the last PPRG meeting of the Fall 2014 semester, Daniel Moseley will give a presentation on gun violence and mental disorders. The talk will focus on ethical, legal and political issues that emerge from taking a public health perspective on gun violence. We’ll meet on Wednesday, November 19 at the usual time and place–7:00pm-8:30pm in room 213 of Caldwell Hall. Refreshments will be provided. There are no advance readings for this discussion. PPRG will resume meeting in January 2015.

Presentation: Abraham Nussbaum, “My doctor recommended pot: A decade of Mile High Mints, Mountain High Suckers, Honey Dabs, and how they have altered the patient-physician relationship in Colorado”

We are pleased to announce that Abraham Nussbuam will give a presentation on “My doctor recommended pot: A decade of Mile High Mints, Mountain High Suckers, Honey Dabs, and how they have altered the patient-physician relationship in Colorado” at the next PPRG meeting, which will be this Wednesday, November 5 from 7:00pm-8:30pm in room 213 of Caldwell Hall. Refreshments will be provided (he, he). RSVP to Dan if you plan to attend. There are no advance readings for this session.

Presentation: Warren Kinghorn, “The Political Science of Psychiatric Diagnosis: A Moral Defense of the DSM”

We are pleased that Warren Kinghorn (Duke, Divinity School and Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences) will present his paper “The Political Science of Psychiatric Diagnosis: A Moral Defense of the DSM” (which is forthcoming in a collection on philosophical issues in psychiatry that Gary and Dan are editing) at the next meeting of PPRG, which will be on Wednesday, October 22 from 7:00pm-8:30pm in room 213 of Caldwell Hall. Refreshments will be provided. RSVP to Dan (daniel.moseley@unc.edu) if you plan to attend or would like a copy of the reading.

Discussion: Hanna Pickard “Responsibility without Blame: Philosophical Reflections on Clinical Practice”

At the next PPRG meeting Larisa Svirsky will lead a discussion of Hanna Pickard’s paper “Responsibility without Blame: Philosophical Reflections on Clinical Practice”–including a commentary by Lisa Ward (Chapter 66 of The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy and Psychiatry, pp.1134-1154).

Abstract: “Effective treatment of disorders of agency presents a clinical conundrum. Many of the core symptoms or maintaining factors are actions and omissions that cause harm to self and others. Encouraging service users to take responsibility for this behavior is central to treatment. Blame, in contrast, is detrimental. How is it possible to hold service users responsible for actions and omissions that cause harm without blaming them? A solution to this problem is part conceptual, part practical. This chapter offers a conceptual framework that clearly distinguishes between ideas of responsibility, blameworthiness, and “detached” and “affective” blame. It argues that affective blame is detrimental to effective treatment. And it suggests that affective blame can be avoided by attention to service users’ past history, which directly evokes compassion and empathy. Finally, the chapter briefly considers whether the clinical stance of responsibility without blame should be adopted in non-clinical interpersonal and social contexts.”

We will meet on Wednesday, Oct 1. from 7:00pm-8:30pm in room 213 of Caldwell Hall. Refreshments will be provided. RSVP to Dan if you plan to attend or would like a copy of the reading.